FAQ

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  • Tell me about yourself?

    While this is asked of interviewees across all industries, it carries an added weight for creatives because you are your brand. Open-ended requests like these can leave even the most seasoned interviewees stumped if they haven’t prepared. Key points to share are recent successes, strengths and abilities that relate to the job or company, and a statement on your current situation.

  • Why do you want to work for us?

    Employers want to know that you’re interested in working with them, specifically. This is your opportunity to show them just that. “Acme Agency is a vanguard in the advertising world. When applying for jobs, I keep an eye out for places where learning and retooling are encouraged. Acme struck me as a place where I could do just that with industry leaders”

  • Where do you see yourself in five years?

    With this question, your potential employer wants to hire someone that sees this role as a good career move. A happy and motivated employee means a productive and a highly retentive one. “My goal right now is to work in a company that enables me to work with people I can learn from. Later down the line, I would like to hold more responsibility for creative direction.”

  • W Why did you choose this as a profession?

    Employers ask this because they want to know who they’re working with. Talking points include your education, personal experience, and motivation behind working for the industry. Perhaps you could share how your penchant for doodling carried on well into adulthood so you decided to take a course in this field or simply that you want to make the world more beautiful or user-friendly.

  • What are your strengths and weaknesses?

    Employers ask this question to ensure that your abilities line up with the skills needed for the role. More importantly, they’re looking for candidates that are confident and self-aware about their strengths and shortcomings. When talking about your strength(s) ensure you have an example or two handy to illustrate how it has benefitted you or others. A strength can be something technical, like UX, or something less tangible, like problem-solving.

  • Do you work better alone or in a group?

    While your day-to-day would typically consist of solo work, graphic designers should be able to work well with coworkers (e.g. UX, developers, copywriters) and clients. Like your strength and/or weakness question, it’s best to answer truthfully so your manager knows your preference.